Lombardi: Stock Market Commentary & Forecasts, Financial & Economic Analysis Since 1986

Big Banks

There are thousands of banks in the U.S., but only a few “big banks.” These big banks are of such size and market share penetration that they have a dominant position in the markets in which they are active. Big banks tend to cover the entire nation, including an international presence. They also provide services in all areas of the financial industry, whereas a small bank might only cover a certain subset of services.

Having Trouble Coming Up With Four Hundred Bucks

By for Profit Confidential

Economic Growth in 2014The burning question that’s facing economists like me today and that will only be answered in the future: did creating $3.0 trillion in new money out of thin air really make things better or worse for America?

My personal view, as expressed in these pages, is that the rich (the big banks and Wall Street) got richer from the “printing press” era, while the average American did not directly benefit from the Fed’s actions.

In fact, in America today, the spread in wealth between the rich and the poor has never been so great. As for the middle class, they are becoming extinct.

The “Report on the Economic Well-Being of U.S. Households in 2013,” recently published by the Federal Reserve, says 34% of Americans feel they are worse off today than they were five years ago, and 42% said they are holding back on the purchase of major or expensive items. (Source: Federal Reserve, August 7, 2014.)

But the data gets worse…

Of those Americans who had savings prior to the 2008 recession, 57% of them say they have used up some or all of their savings in order to combat the after-effects of the Great Recession.

Only 48% of Americans said that they would be able to cover a “hypothetical emergency expense” that costs $400.00 without selling something or borrowing money. Simply put, about half of Americans have less than $400.00 in emergency funds!

Meanwhile, 31% of Americans say they do not have any retirement savings or pension. Of those who are between the ages of 55 and 64, 24% of them expect to work as long as possible, … Read More

Dead-Cat Bounce Over for the Housing Market?

By for Profit Confidential

Momentum Housing Market Shows Clear Signs EasingI have been saying this for a while: You can’t have a housing recovery unless actual home buyers are involved.

We are very far away from seeing the housing market reach its 2005 highs…and as time passes, it becomes clearer that this generation may never see them again.

How can I say that?

What we have seen in the housing market since then, but mostly since 2012, in my opinion, is nothing more than a dead-cat bounce scenario—an increase in prices after a massive decline. The chart below shows how far off we are from the housing prices of 2005.

S&P Case - Shiller Home Price Chart Chart courtesy of www.StockCharts.com

One of the key indicators I follow in respect to the state of the housing market is mortgage originations. This data gives me an idea about demand for homes, as rising demand for mortgages means more people are buying homes. And as demand increases, prices should be increasing.

But the opposite is happening…

In the first quarter of 2014, mortgage originations at Citigroup Inc. (NYSE/C) declined 71% from the same period a year ago. The bank issued $5.2 billion in mortgages in the first quarter of 2014, compared to $8.3 billion in the previous quarter and $18.0 billion in the first quarter of 2013. (Source: Citigroup Inc. web site, last accessed April 14, 2014.)

Total mortgage origination volume at JPMorgan Chase & Co. (NYSE/JPM) declined by 68% in the first quarter of 2014 from the same period a year ago. At JPMorgan, in the first quarter of 2014, $17.0 billion worth of mortgages were issued, compared to $52.7 billion in the same period a year ago. … Read More

The Best Investment You Can Make in 2014?

By for Profit Confidential

What Happened Last Time Gold Had a Bad YearTo say the very least, 2013 was an interesting year for gold bullion. The precious metal’s price surprised gold bugs and declined 24%.

As 2013 progressed, we heard calls for the yellow metal to fall even lower in price. The stocks of gold producers were slammed. Equity research departments at big banks like The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc. (NYSE/GS) called gold bullion a slam-dunk sell (and the last time I checked, their opinion hasn’t changed).

In the midst of all this, a very important phenomenon was forgotten: gold bullion prices are no stranger to price declines. In the table below, I’ve compiled a list of every period since 1974 when gold prices fell more than 20% and what happened after the decline.

Year, % Drop in Gold Prices Year, % Increase After Drop
1974-1976 declined by 45.67% 1976-1980 increased by 705%
1980-1982 declined by 63.84% 1982-1983 increased by 71.8%
1983-1985 declined by 45.17% 1985-1987 increased by 76.7%
1987-2001 declined by 48.88% 2001-2008 increased by 291.38%
Mar. 2008-Nov. 2008 declined by 28.8% Nov. 2008-2011 increased by 169.56%

Data source: www.StockCharts.com, last accessed February 6, 2014.

The table above illustrates that the bigger the decline in gold bullion prices, the greater the ensuing rebound.

Since gold bullion prices fell in 2013, gold miners have pulled back on operations at mines where $1,200-an-ounce gold no longer justifies production. This has resulted in a reduction in the supply of newly mined gold.

And while the supply of gold bullion is under pressure, demand for the precious metal keeps increasing. In China, both consumers and the country’s central bank have become gold hoarders over … Read More

The Company I Like Among the “Out-of-Favor” Stocks

By for Profit Confidential

Top Stocks for Investing Against the HeardWhen it comes to love, we often hear the phrase, “Beauty is in the eye of the beholder.” Well, the same could be said for the stock market.

Many investors look for the companies that deliver consistent results and satisfy the number-crunchers on Wall Street. While I belong to that group, I also take alternative views and search for companies that are the so-called dogs of the stock market. However, as our theme suggests, choosing in the stock market based only on a company’s outer appearance doesn’t always produce the best outcome.

Think about it this way: Why always select the stocks that are in favor by the stock market? Often, you may be the last to the dance, so you end up chasing stocks that have already made major stock market moves—the upside is limited.

I like looking at distressed companies that are facing some hurdles but have enough upside potential to make these stocks a worthwhile trade in the stock market. These plays are often referred to as contrarian investments—companies that are out of favor but have enough potential to demand a closer look in the stock market. In this case, you are often buying a company at a low valuation and price, as the stock market has turned against them.

I like these contrarian situations, as the potential upside is significant if these companies can turn around their operations.

In the past, I have highlighted opportunities such as Groupon, Inc. (NASDAQ/GRPN) and Facebook, Inc. (NASDAQ/FB)—both of which made spectacular gains thereafter. (Read “Why Macy’s Is Such a ‘Good’ Retail Play.”)

Nokia Corporation (NYSE/NOK) was … Read More

If You Are in the Housing Market, You Need to Read This

By for Profit Confidential

Leading Indicator Flashes Red Warning Sign for HousingTo see where the U.S. housing market is headed, we really need to look at what real home buyers—those who are planning to stay in their home for the long term—are doing. Institutional investors, who came into the housing market in 2012 and bought massive amounts of homes, are speculators; they’ll quickly rush out of the housing market if they can get a profit or if they can get a better return on their money elsewhere.

Right now, real home buyers are not very active in the U.S. housing market, as they face challenges. In fact, it looks like the number of real home buyers in the housing market is declining.

Between January and December of 2013, the 30-year fixed mortgage rate tracked by Freddie Mac increased by 31%. The 30-year fixed mortgage rate stood at 3.41% in January, and it increased to 4.46% by December. (Source: Freddie Mac web site, last accessed January 15, 2014.) Higher interest costs are a real challenge for home buyers.

As we can see from the chart below, there was a sudden change in the direction of interest rates after the Federal Reserve hinted in the spring of 2013 that it would start to “taper” its quantitative easing (money printing) program. It is widely expected that the Fed will continue to taper throughout 2014 as it drastically pulls back on its massive money printing scheme.

30-Year T-Bond Yield Chart

Chart courtesy of www.StockCharts.com

Another challenge home buyers face is stagnant growth in their incomes. In 2013, average hourly earnings of production and nonsupervisory employees in the U.S. increased by only 1.85%—less than real inflation. (Source: Federal Reserve Bank … Read More

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The Great Crash of 2014

A stock market crash bigger than what happened in 2008 and early 2009 is headed our way.

In fact, we are predicting this crash will be even more devastating than the 1929 crash…

…the ramifications of which will hit the economy and Americans deeper than anything we’ve ever seen.

Our 27-year-old research firm feels so strongly about this, we’ve just produced a video to warn investors called, “The Great Crash of 2014.”

In case you are not familiar with our research work on the stock market:

In late 2001, in the aftermath of 9/11, we told our clients to buy small-cap stocks. They rose about 100% after we made that call.

We were one of the first major advisors to turn bullish on gold.

Throughout 2002, we urged our readers to buy gold stocks; many of which doubled and even tripled in price.

In November of 2007, we started begging our customers to get out of the stock market. Shortly afterwards, it was widely recognized that October 2007 was the top for stocks.

We correctly predicted the crash in the stock market of 2008 and early 2009.

And in March of 2009, we started telling our readers to jump into small caps. The Russell 2000 gained about 175% from when we made that call in 2009 to today.

Many investors will find our next prediction hard to believe until they see all the proof we have to back it up.

Even if you don’t own stocks, what’s about to happen will affect you!

I urge you to be among the first to get our next major prediction.
See it here now in this just-released alarming video.

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