Interest Rates

Of all the different elements of the economy, the direction of interest rates is most important. That’s why, as the editors of Profit Confidential, we expend a considerable amount of our time analyzing and providing guidance on interest rates. We believe that the unprecedented debt the U.S. has accumulated will eventually result in foreign investors demanding a better return on U.S. Treasuries. Too many U.S. dollars in circulation will also eventually force interest rates to rise.

Economics 101 suggests inflationary pressure builds during periods of low interest rates. The demand usually increases when people both borrow and consume more. As the price of goods and services is directly correlated with demand, it increases—resulting in inflation.

To tackle inflationary pressures, central banks increase interest rates. Why? Because once they increase interest rates, it is supposed to do the opposite of lowering the rates—forcing people to save and cut back on discretionary spending.

Following a 30-year down-cycle of interest rates in the U.S., we are on the cusp of a new 30-year up-cycle in interest rates; a move that could cripple the government and the economy. This is mainly because the government has added too much debt to its balance sheet, and the Federal Reserve has printed significant sums of money.

After phenomenal amounts of bailouts were doled out, followed by non-stop government spending, the U.S. national debt rose 76.2%—from $9.2 trillion in 2008, to $16.3 trillion in 2012. (Source: TreasuryDirect, last accessed November 27, 2012.)

It gets worse. The current administration said it would keep the budget deficit below $1.0 trillion. It hasn’t. For fiscal 2012, the federal budget deficit was $1.1 trillion, slightly below the $1.3 trillion deficit recorded in 2011. (Source: U.S. Department of the Treasury, October 12, 2012.) What’s more, 2012 marked the fourth consecutive year in which the U.S. government experienced an annual deficit above $1.0 trillion. As a percentage of gross domestic product (GDP), the U.S. government’s budget deficit for the year 2012 stands at seven percent.

Along with skyrocketing government debt, the Federal Reserve has printed $3.0 trillion. Where did the $3.0 trillion come from? It’s not backed by gold. It was simply created out of thin air. And, the presses continue to print an additional $85.0 billion a month!

Looking at an even bigger picture, between January 2000 and September 2012, the amount of U.S. money in circulation (the “M1 money supply”) has increased 112%, or $1.25 trillion. That’s a lot of money printing.

Similarly, the “M2 money supply,” which includes the M1 money supply plus savings deposits, balances in money market mutual funds, and deposits, has increased 118%. M2 is a better measure of actual money supply. Since the beginning of 2000, M2 money supply has increased more than $5.4 trillion. (Source: Federal Reserve, October 11, 2012.) Again, the printing presses have been in overdrive.

Now think of it this way; as more money is created and more debt is added to the federal government’s balance sheet, U.S. economic viability becomes questionable. What does this mean? The interest rate at which the government is currently able to borrow is being kept artificially low. With the government adding more debt and the inflationary pressure building—something has to be done.


Gaurav Iyer: Wall Street’s Stock Market Bubble Example of Mass Delusion

By Wednesday, August 26, 2015
stock market crashAfter several years of historically low interest rates, the Federal Reserve declared intentions for a rate hike this year, barring an economic slowdown. That’s why you can bet Janet Yellen and her fellow policymakers are closely monitoring China’s stock market crash and its impact on U.S. stocks. Recent data points show conflicting.

Peter Schiff: Interest Rate Hike Could Spark Economic Collapse

By Wednesday, August 26, 2015
Peter-SchiffImage by commons.wikimedia.org
Forget about higher interest rates. To starve off an economic collapse, the Federal Reserve may have to resort to another round of quantitative easing. At least, that’s according to famed investor Peter Schiff. “It’s not just a 580 points we drop today or the 530 on Friday or the 350 on Thursday,”
.

Stanley Druckenmiller Buys $300 Million in Gold; Should You Buy, Too?

By Friday, August 21, 2015
Gold-PriceThe tumbling gold prices in recent years have made the shiny metal look down and out. However, not everyone shares the bearish view. In fact, billionaire investor Stan Druckenmiller just bought millions of shares of a gold exchange traded fund (ETF). If you are not familiar with Stan Druckenmiller, know this: he used to be the chief strategist.

Billionaire Stanley Druckenmiller Buys 2.9 Million Shares of SPDR Gold Shares (NYSEArca:GLD)

By Monday, August 17, 2015
Gold InvestingThe downfall of gold prices has sent gold exchange-traded funds (ETFs) falling in recent years. However, billionaire investor Stanley Druckenmiller just bought millions of shares of SPDR Gold Shares (NYSE:GLD). The gold ETF is now the largest holding of Stanley Druckenmiller’s family office. (Source: The Securities and Exchange.

Gold Prices to Soar as Bonds Market Heads for Trouble?

By Thursday, August 13, 2015
Gold InvestingThanks to irrationality; gold prices have fallen to the levels not seen since 2010. As I see it, at the current price, the precious metal is presenting a great long-term opportunity. One of the biggest reasons investors should be paying attention to the yellow metal is the turbulence expected in the bonds market. It has the ability to send.

Poll

Will slowdown in China affect the U.S. economy?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...
×
From: Michael Lombardi, MBA
Subject: The $2 Silver Stock Every Investor Should Own!

Read this message