Quantitative Easing

Quantitative easing is a monetary policy tool used by a central bank to try and stimulate an economy when the economic cycle is far below optimum levels. Central banks increase the quantity of money in the financial system through quantitative easing by purchasing securities, such as treasury bonds, to increase the price of assets; this will lower prevailing yields and entice investors into other areas that might be more beneficial for an economic rebound. One worry with quantitative easing is that the increase in the supply of money might lead to inflation, or the overall increase in the price of goods.


For a number of years now, I’ve maintained that the U.S. and global economies would be in better shape had the central banks from around the world never intervened. After eight years of manipulating interest rates and pouring trillions of…

This past Friday, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported only 142,000 jobs were added to the U.S. economy in September. And August’s figure was revised lower from 173,000 previously reported jobs created to an actual number of only 136,000 jobs.…

Crude oil prices are currently trading at a six-year low and threatening to slide even lower as global financial markets are still trying to come to terms with Monday’s catastrophic dips. I sat down with our in-house energy specialist Peter…

Despite weak gold prices, excess money printed by the world’s central banks could ignite inflation, driving investors to safe haven assets. Policymakers have been using monetary policy as a form of stimulus in recent years, building a house of cards…

Ask even an amateur economist, and they will tell you this: an increasing money supply eventually leads to inflation. It’s a simple concept; the more paper money there is in the system, the less it’s worth and the less it…

It’s finally over… The quantitative easing programs initially started by the Federal Reserve six years ago are (for now) history. In its statement on October 29, the Federal Reserve said, “Accordingly, the Committee decided to conclude its asset purchase program…

The chart below shows us that between April and August of this year, home prices in the U.S. declined. The S&P Case-Shiller Home Price Index is only released 60 days after each month’s end, so while data for September and…

It’s widely expected that at the end of this month, the Federal Reserve will end its third round of quantitative easing (that began in September of 2012). This is QE3, where the Federal Reserve was printing $85.0 billion of new…

According to the Investment Company Institute, assets in institutional money market funds increased $17.19 billion to $1.69 trillion for the week ended on September 24, 2014. This was the biggest weekly increase in these money market funds in the last…

Don’t buy into the notion that there’s economic growth in America! We’ve already seen U.S. gross domestic product (GDP) “unexpectedly” decline in the first quarter of 2014, and now there are signs of another contraction in the current quarter. (The…

With the Dow Jones hitting 17,000 being pretty likely in the not-too-distant future, from there, it’s only another 18% or so until the Dow hits 20,000, which is pretty incredible. These numbers seemed so unrealistic just a few years ago…