Lombardi: Stock Market Commentary & Forecasts, Financial & Economic Analysis Since 1986

Posts Tagged ‘Dow Jones Industrial Average’

The Only Thing I Can Find to “Buy Low” These Days

By for Profit Confidential

The Second Half of 2014 What It Looks Like for GoldThe tally as of this morning:

The stock market is up 2.4% so far in 2014 as measured by the Dow Jones Industrial Average, while gold bullion is up 8.1% for the year.

“As an investor, do I get into gold or stocks at this point in the year?”

Well, if you’ve been reading my articles for a while, you know I’m not a fan of stocks right now. I simply believe the stock market has become a Federal Reserve–induced bubble.

And while there has been a lot written about price manipulation in the gold market, and while mighty Goldman Sachs still says the metal is headed lower in price, investors should look at gold bullion right now…that’s both old gold investors (so they can average down their cost) and new gold investors taking their first position.

Here are my reasons why…

In 2013, the Indian central bank and government imposed tariffs and restrictions on the importation of gold bullion into India, as they believed the demand for gold bullion in the country was hurting its national accounts. In the first quarter of this year, India started to ease its gold importation restrictions, and bang, last month, gold bullion imports into the country increased by 65% over June of last year. (Source: Bloomberg, July 16, 2014.) Demand for gold bullion in China, which I’ve documented in these pages, is also very strong.

Inflation, what gold bullion acts as a hedge against, is starting to gain momentum. The Producer Price Index (which tracks changes in the prices producers pay) increased by 0.4% in June from the previous month; that’s an annualized … Read More

How Many Warnings Can You Give?

By for Profit Confidential

Why Stocks Will Not End 2014 WellI’ve been writing in these pages for most of 2014 on how the stock market has become one huge bubble. On my short list:

The economy is weak. The U.S. experienced negative growth in the first quarter of 2014. If the same thing happens in the second quarter (we’ll soon know), we will be in a recession again. Revenue growth at big companies is almost non-existent.

Insiders at public companies are selling stocks (in the companies they work for) at a record pace.

The amount of money investors have borrowed to buy stocks is at a record high (a negative for the stock market).

The VIX “Fear” index, which measures the amount of fear investors have about stocks declining, is near a record low (another negative for the stock market).

Bullishness among stock advisors, as measured by Investors Intelligence, is near a record high (again, a negative for the stock market).

The Federal Reserve has issued its economic outlook, and it says interest rates will be much higher at the end of 2015 than they are today and that they will continue moving upward in 2016.

The Federal Reserve has said it will be out of the money printing business by the end of this year. (Who will buy all those T-bills the U.S. government has to issue to keep in business?)

And yesterday, in an unprecedented statement, Janet Yellen, during her usual semi-annual testimony to Congress, said the valuations of tech stocks are “high relative to historical norms.”

How many warnings can you give investors?

Well, the warnings don’t seem to matter. The Dow Jones Industrial Average has … Read More

What’s Up Three Times More Than Stocks So Far This Year?

By for Profit Confidential

Where Gold Will Trade in the Second Half of 2014Investors who bought gold bullion in early 2014 know it was a great decision. The precious metal has increased 10.2% in price between January and June, while the Dow Jones Industrial Average climbed by just three percent.

So far, so good—and as expected.

Going forward, it will not be surprising to me to see the precious metal outperform the stock market in the second half of the year as well.

Why will this happen?

As demand for gold bullion continues to rise and as supply declines (the exact situation we have today), gold bullion prices will have no option but to rise.

In the table below, I have plotted the production of gold bullion at U.S. mines for the first three months of the year compared to the first three months of 2013. Production at U.S. gold mines is declining month after month.

Production at U.S. Gold Mines, 1Q2013 vs. 1Q2014

Month 2013 Output (in Kg) 2014 Output (in Kg) % Change Year-over-Year
January 18600 18,500 -0.54%
February 17,300 17,100 -1.16%
March 18,700 18,200 -2.67%
Total 54,600 53,800 -1.47%

Data source: U.S. Geological Survey web site, last accessed July 1, 2014

While the chart above only details U.S. gold mining production, gold bullion production across the global economy is declining. Last year, as the yellow metal witnessed a massive sell-off in price, gold mining companies cut back on their exploration and capital expenditures budgets. This is now catching up and derailing production. And I see the situation for supply only getting worse.

Meanwhile, demand for gold bullion keeps rising.

We continue to see significant demand for the precious metal—and not … Read More

This Is Odd…

By for Profit Confidential

Demand for Stocks Outweighs Supply at This PointOne of the oddest things to happen with the stock market since it has recovered is that the number of shares trading hands each day has slowly disappeared.

In the table that I have created for you below, I list the trading volume for the S&P 500 for each June since 2009 and the percentage change in volume from the previous June.

Trading volume on the S&P 500 has dropped 60% since 2009!

Trading Volume, S&P 500, June of Each Year, 2009 – 2014

Year Volume (Shares Traded Per Month) Year-Over-Year % Change
June 2009 93,147,496,448
June 2010 91,971,043,328 -1.3%
June 2011 63,674,499,072 -30.8%
June 2012 59,703,365,632 -6.2%
June 2013 51,560,980,480 -13.6%
June 2014 38,765,629,440 -24.8%

Data source: www.StockCharts.com, last accessed July 1, 2014

What’s happening here? How can the stock market rise year after year if trading volume is down?

It’s very simple, but I’ll explain this new phenomenon in a moment. First, look at the chart of the S&P 500 below. Pay close attention to the volume at the bottom of the chart. As volume on the S&P 500 collapsed, the price of the index rose.

S&P 500 Large Cap Index Chart

Chart courtesy of www.StockCharts.com

Volume is collapsing because the number of shares companies have outstanding is being reduced at an accelerated rate. For example, in the first quarter of 2014, S&P 500 companies purchased $154.5 billion worth of their shares back (stock buyback programs). Over the trailing 12 months, S&P 500 companies purchased more than half-a-trillion-dollars worth of their own shares—$535.2 billion to be exact. (Source: FactSet, June 18, 2014.)

Add to the shrinking number of shares outstanding the fact that central … Read More

Guess Who Is Pushing the Stock Market Higher Now

By for Profit Confidential

So That's Why Stocks Have Been Moving Higher…When I look at the stock market, I ask who in their right mind would buy stocks?

While key stock market indices creep higher, the fundamentals suggest the complete opposite. But despite valuations being stretched, insiders selling, corporate revenue growth being non-existent, and the U.S. economy contracting in the first quarter of this year, the S&P 500 is up seven percent since the beginning of 2014, the Dow Jones Industrial Average is getting closer to the 17,000 level, and the NASDAQ is back above 4,000.

As I have written before, a company can buy back its stock to prop up per-share earnings or cut expenses to improve the bottom line, but if revenue isn’t growing, there is a problem. In the first quarter of 2014, only 54% of S&P 500 companies were able to grow their revenue. (Source: FactSet, June 13, 2014.)

Going forward, things aren’t looking bright either. For the second quarter of 2014, 82 S&P 500 companies have already provided negative guidance for their corporate earnings. I expect this number to climb higher.

And consumer spending, the driver of the U.S. economy, is very weak, as evidenced by negative gross domestic product (GDP) in the U.S. economy in the first quarter of this year.

So if the overall environment is negative for the equities, who is buying stocks and pushing the stock market higher?

The answer (something I suspected some time ago): central banks are buying stocks.

A study done by the Official Monetary and Financial Institution Forum (OMFIF) called Global Public Investors 2014, states that central banks and public institutions around the world have gotten involved … Read More

Why We Are Closer to a Recession in 2014 Than You Think

By for Profit Confidential

U.S. Economy to Fall into a Recession This QuarterDon’t buy into the notion that there’s economic growth in America!

We’ve already seen U.S. gross domestic product (GDP) “unexpectedly” decline in the first quarter of 2014, and now there are signs of another contraction in the current quarter. (The technical definition of a recession is two negative quarters of GDP—we’re halfway there!)

As you know, consumer spending is the biggest part of our U.S. economy, accounting for about two-thirds of our GDP. And consumers are pulling back.

Consumer spending in the U.S. economy declined 0.26% in April from March. This was the first monthly decline since December of 2013. (Source: Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis web site, last accessed June 4, 2014.)

And while consumer spending is one indicator that suggests a recession may soon be coming into play in the U.S. economy, there’s also one very interesting phenomenon occurring that suggests the very same.

The Federal Reserve is serious about pulling back on its quantitative easing program. And in anticipation of the Fed pulling back on money printing (when it first indicated it would start tapering), the yields on bonds shot up.

But since 2014 began, and the Federal Reserve actually started to taper, the yield on the long-term 30-year U.S. bond has declined more than 12%.

 30 Year t Bond Yield Chart

Chart courtesy of www.StockCharts.com

If the Fed is pulling back on printing (it has said it wants to be out of the money printing business by the end of this year), why are bond yields declining?

From a fundamental point of view, it suggests the market anticipates very slow growth for the U.S. economy ahead.

Dear reader, the perfect … Read More

Flight to Safety Rewarding These Top Stocks

By for Profit Confidential

Investors' Flight to Safety Putting These Stocks on TopMy dad is earning a few percentage points on his fixed-income yields. Fortunately for him, that’s sufficient to live on when combined with his monthly pension and savings. He has no mortgage and lives a pretty normal, but somewhat frugal life.

In fact, Dad has always favored the fixed-income market for his investments as he doesn’t like risk. But for many Americans, the need for an ample flow of income during your retirement is a necessity for surviving, especially if the Great Recession wiped out your 401(k).

With the 10-year bond yield languishing below three percent, it would be difficult to live on this income, unless you have sufficient bond holdings or other avenues of income, like my dad’s pension. Having a more frugal or cost-conscious lifestyle also helps for many in retirement.

Yet the one area that I feel has been extremely positive for investors over the past five years is the dividend paying stocks that provide far higher yields and preferred tax treatment versus bonds. My dad may not be open to dividend paying stocks, but it makes sense for many other investors.

In reality, the Dow Jones and dividend paying stocks have returned some impressive capital gains and income over the past years. I expect this to continue in the current investment climate, where the stock market is favoring less risk.

Take a look at the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA), which is slightly in positive territory, but at the same time, laying out income via dividend paying stocks.

The income stream has also been inviting with the average dividend yield on the 30 Dow blue-chip dividend … Read More

If You Only Look at One Picture Today, Make it This One

By for Profit Confidential

Stock Advisors Most Bullish Since 2007Five years ago, it looked like the world was falling apart. Remember when Lehman Brothers went bankrupt, freezing financing on Wall Street? The government had to bail out General Motors and the Federal Reserve pumped money into too-big-to-fail banks. Investors were running scared of the stock market.

Seems like years ago…but it was only 2008 and 2009 when this all happened. Fast-forward to today, and thanks to trillions of dollars of new money (printed out of thin air), the Dow Jones Industrial Average has ballooned back, close to 17,000.

The stock market became a bubble in 2007 when it surpassed 14,000, subsequently crashing down to 6,440 in March of 2009. Now the bubble is back; but bigger this time.

Bears like me, who believe the Fed created this new stock market bubble, are rare to find. More and more stock advisors and investors have turned bullish. They believe—incorrectly, I suggest—that all is well with the economy and that the stock market will head higher and higher.

To see just how many advisors have turned bullish on stocks, I really want you to look at the below chart of the Investors Intelligence Bull Index. Under the chart, you will see a black line, indicating the S&P 500.

 Investers Intellegence Bulls Chart

Chart courtesy of  StockCharts.com

The Investors Intelligence Bull Index tracks stock advisors’ opinions on the stock market. Currently, the index of stock advisors’ sentiment stands at 62.20, its highest level since (you guessed it) October of 2007. Whenever this index has gone over 60, the stock market has come down hard.

When it comes to investing, you don’t want to do what … Read More

Why Stocks Won’t Break Until This Indicator Does

By for Profit Confidential

The One Indicator Keeping This Market AliveThe Dow Jones Transportation Average keeps powering ahead, and the rest of the stock market is very close behind it.

The strong performance of this index is confirmation of further Dow theory gains. The Dow Jones Industrial Average has been fighting its way higher since May 20.

Some of the performances of transportation stocks have been truly spectacular and very much a reflection of a bull market.

Alaska Air Group, Inc. (ALK) just bounced off $100.00 a share. It was $50.00 a share late June last year.

Union Pacific Corporation (UNP), which has been one of my favorite benchmark stocks for gauging industrial economic activity and the stock market, is right around $200.00 a share. (See “Buybacks, Dividends, Stock Splits: Business Is Getting Better for This Must-Watch Stock.”)

It was $150.00 a year ago, which is a very good capital gain for such a mature large-cap enterprise.

And Southwest Airlines Co. (LUV) just hit an all-time record-high, about double what it was trading at this time last year.

The Dow Jones Transportation Average is old economy, but it is a very meaningful gauge for the rest of the stock market. I advise all investors to follow the index on a frequent basis. The broader market is highly unlikely to break down without a commensurate move in transportation stocks.

The NASDAQ Composite and Russell 2000 can certainly be more volatile, but generally speaking, so long as the Dow Jones Transportation Average is holding up, so will the rest of the market.

Since the financial crisis, big corporations have been very unwilling to invest in new operations. But in what … Read More

About That Economic Mirage We Are Living Today

By for Profit Confidential

U.S. Economy Contracts in First Quarter of 2014. Someone Tell the Stock Market!Dear reader, yesterday we got the news that the U.S. economy “unexpectedly” contracted by one percent in the first three months of this year. This is the first time since the first quarter of 2011 that the U.S. experienced negative growth!

This news should come as no surprise to my readers, as I’ve been writing for months how my research shows the U.S. economy is slowing. Most obviously, U.S. companies had a terrible first quarter in respect to earnings growth. In respect to revenue growth, it’s nonexistent.

So why is the stock market rising? Well, it’s not really rising; it’s an illusion. Yes, we keep hearing in the news how the stock market is breaking to new highs. But if we look at the Dow Jones Industrial Average, it’s up only one percent so far in 2014. The Russell 2000 Index (a broader gauge of the market) is actually down 2.5% for the year.

And the money going into buying stocks is actually collapsing. In the first five months of this year, the volume on the S&P 500 was the lowest since 2007!

When you have a stock market rising on weaker and weaker trading volume, it’s a very dangerous stock market. In fact, in the last two months (April and May), there hasn’t been a day when volume on the Dow Jones Industrial Average was more than 500 million shares. In 2013, there were only seven days when the volume on the Dow Jones Industrial Average was less than 500 million!

The rising (or should I say “holding-its-own”) stock market has convinced the media, economists, government, and investors that … Read More

Double Bottom in for Gold Prices?

By for Profit Confidential

Gold Bullion Fear Index CollapsesWhile the Federal Reserve has cut back on its money printing program, the fact of the matter is that the “official” U.S. national debt is closing in on $18.0 trillion. The unofficial national debt (when obligations like Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid, welfare, and now Obamacare are taken into consideration) is closer to $200 trillion.

The Japanese national debt just hit one quadrillion yuan.

Many countries in the eurozone are drowning under debt. The European Central Bank recently started talking about printing money to finally get the eurozone out of its mess.

All of this is very well-known to Profit Confidential readers.

Why do I bring this up again today? I’m back focusing on debt because it is becoming more and more apparent that the only way to reduce the record national debt many industrialized countries have accumulated since the Credit Crisis of 2008 is to print even more money.

And the collapse in the volatility of gold bullion prices could be pointing to just that. To see what I’m talking about, take a look at this chart:

Volatility Index - CBOE Gold INDX ChartChart courtesy of www.StockCharts.com

In April of 2013, when the sharp decline in gold bullion prices began, volatility for gold prices was very high. Since then, the volatility index for gold, an index that essentially gauges investors’ fear factor for gold bullion prices, has collapsed.

And when we look at the price chart of gold bullion (see next chart below), we see strong support for the metal just below the $1,200-an-ounce level. This level has been tested twice and on both occasions, gold failed to fall below $1,200. In technical analysis, this is … Read More

The Start of the Collapse for “Internet Darling” Stocks?

By for Profit Confidential

Amazon Stock The Fall from Grace StartsIf you want to see what happens when irrationality over a stock comes to an end, check out this chart of Amazon.com, Inc. (NASDAQ/AMZN).

In 2013, Amazon.com stock went up 63%. So far this year, the stock has collapsed 25% as investors realize converting growing revenues into corporate earnings for Internet-based stocks on key stock indices is not an easy task.

Mind you, Amazon.com isn’t the only tech stock on the key stock indices that is getting hit. Other tech stocks are under pressure, too, as evidenced by the NASDAQ being down for the year.

But despite stocks being overvalued—and some very big-name Internet stocks on the key stock indices coming down in price—investors continue to buy.

Amazon.com Chart Chart courtesy of www.StockCharts.com

In the first three months of this year, the long-term stock mutual funds saw inflows of $54.13 billion. (Source: “Historical Flow Data,” Investment Company Institute web site, last accessed May 12, 2014.) April’s monthly figures aren’t available just yet, but from weekly data, we estimate another $10.0 billion worth of long-term stock mutual funds were bought in April.

And they are buying stocks with borrowed money. As of March, margin debt on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) stood at a record $450.2 billion, up 19% from March of 2013. (Source: New York Stock Exchange web site, last accessed May 12, 2014.)

But this is what I find most interesting…

Even though investors have borrowed more money than any other time in history to buy stocks, most key stock indices are flat for the year. Among the key stock indices, the Dow Jones Industrial Average is up marginally, while … Read More

Multi-Month Price Consolidation in the Cards

By for Profit Confidential

How Profit Choppy Market HighThere still is no real trend in the equity market. One day, stocks sell off big-time; the next, the S&P 500 and Dow Jones Industrial Average hit new record-highs.

This is a very tough market to figure; anything can happen when monetary policy is highly accommodative.

A lagging NASDAQ Composite isn’t a worry. Neither is the Russell 2000 index. Stocks won’t come apart so long as so many large-caps are pushing their highs.

And not all technology stocks are retrenching, either. Some of the old technology bellwethers are actually doing quite well these days. Microsoft Corporation (MSFT) is trading right at a multiyear high, with a 2.8% dividend yield and a forward price-to-earnings ratio of approximately 14.

Even Intel Corporation (INTC), which is having a pretty tough time generating much in the way of top-line growth, is recovering on the stock market and is very close to breaking out of a multiyear price consolidation. Intel currently offers a 3.4% dividend yield and is not expensively priced.

One day, stocks are reacting to geopolitical events in Ukraine; the next, it’s Chinese economic data, then it’s mergers and acquisitions…

If anything, the reaction to first-quarter earnings was pretty muted. But even though the beginning of the year started out with considerable downside, stocks recovered strongly after policy reassurance from the Federal Reserve. While the action’s still choppy, underlying investor sentiment is holding up.

This is a market that continues to favor existing winners, but not necessarily at the speculative end. (See “Risk vs. Reward: Is It Time to Cash Out of This Bull Market?”) The reticence that launched blue chip … Read More

When the Cows Go Out for Slaughter a Second Time

By for Profit Confidential

When the Cows Go Out for Slaughter a Second TimeDid you see this story in the Wall Street Journal last Friday?

“Retirement investors are putting more money into stocks than they have since markets were slammed by the financial crisis six years ago… Stocks accounted for 67% of employees’ new contributions into retirement portfolios in March… That is the highest percentage since March 2008…” (Source: Wall Street Journal, May 2, 2014.)

You read that right. With stocks at a record-high (and valuations stretched), retirees are pouring back into stocks. Are they getting ready to get slaughtered again? I believe so.

If you are a long-term reader of Profit Confidential, you know my take: the “bear” has done a masterful job at convincing investors the economy has recovered and the stock market is a safe place to invest again. Meanwhile, nothing could be further from the truth.

We are living the slowest post-recession recovery on record. And that recovery has been manipulated by the tampering of the Federal Reserve. You see, the Federal Reserve played a key role in driving the key stock indices higher. In 2009, in the midst of a financial crisis, the central bank started printing money and buying bonds. This resulted in lower bond yields. Those who had money in bonds, who had essentially paid nothing, moved into stocks.

And those record-low interest rates enabled companies in the key stock indices to borrow money and issue new equity, using the money to buy their own stock, thus pushing up per-share corporate earnings.

The end result? 2013 was a banner year for stocks on the key stock indices. But as 2014 came around, we began … Read More

Stock Slammed in 2007/08 Making Strong Comeback

By for Profit Confidential

Harley-Davidson Riding New Wave BuyersFirst-quarter earnings results for Harley-Davidson Inc. (HOG) were good. The motorcycle manufacturer did a solid job boosting its bottom line on what was a decent gain in sales, particularly internationally. First-quarter earnings per share grew 22% to $1.21.

U.S. dealers sold 35,730 new motorcycles in the quarter for a three-percent gain. International dealers sold 21,685 new motorcycles during the quarter, up 11%, with comparative Asia-Pacific sales up 21%.

This produced total bike sales of $1.31 billion in the 2014 first quarter for a gain of 13% over the same quarter of 2013. Gross margin was higher and management reiterated previous guidance of a seven- to nine-percent increase in motorcycle shipments this year.

It was a solid quarter for the company, and the stock bounced nicely higher on the news.

So far this earnings season, the numbers have been pretty modest. Two emerging trends from reporting companies include strengthening business conditions in Europe and Asia, along with the confirmation of existing 2014 guidance. (See “Two Big Trends to Emerge This Earnings Season?”) Generally, the numbers are OK.

Stocks have been able to work through recent jitters and the main indices. Most of the economic data hitting the wires is actually meeting consensus expectations, and this is helping investor sentiment.

However, the NASDAQ Composite and Russell 2000 both have a lot higher to go if the market is to resume an upward trend. The Dow Jones Industrial Average is holding up extremely well.

Harley-Davidson got slammed in 2007 and 2008, dropping from more than $70.00 a share to less than $10.00 in the March low of 2009. What a buying … Read More

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