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GDP Growth

It started with the taxi driver. On the way to our hotel in Paris from Charles de Gaulle airport, he said, “Tourism never recovered after America blew up in 2008.” He was talking about the credit crisis and housing bust we went through in 2008 and 2009 in…

After Wall Street’s spectacular meltdown last week, Nobel laureate Robert Shiller is ready to forecast a full-blown stock market crash. Although second-quarter gross domestic product (GDP) growth was revised up from 2.3% to 3.3%, equities are chronically overvalued and need a massive sell-off before they fall in line…

Oil continues to gush out of the Middle East, North Dakota, Texas, and the Alberta tar sands in Canada. My oil prices outlook continues to be neutral at this point, even with the recent decline. Some would argue there have been over 800 or so oil rigs placed…

The United States’ gross domestic product (GDP) contracted less than expected in the first quarter of 2015; uplifted by stronger household spending, inventories, and residential fixed investment. On Wednesday June 24th, the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) released its third and final estimate of the U.S. GDP for…

On Friday, May 29, the Bureau of Economic Analysis released the second estimate for first-quarter gross domestic product (GDP) of 2015. (Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis, May 29, 2015.) According to the report, U.S. GDP declined at an annual rate of 0.7% in the first quarter of 2015.…

For most of 2015, I have been writing about how the U.S. economy is growing at a very slow pace, if it’s growing at all. The just-released U.S. gross domestic product (GDP) numbers for the first quarter of 2015 confirm this; the economy grew at an annual pace…

This week, the “official” U.S. national debt hit $18.12 trillion. That’s a debt of about $57,000 for each American citizen, regardless if you are a child, adult, or senior! And factors like defaulting student debt and higher interest payments will only push our debt much higher. Consider this:…

To see where the stock market is headed in 2015, we don’t have to look much past these two important economic factors: the U.S. dollar and the economy, both domestically and outside the U.S. Rising U.S. Dollar to Impact U.S. Equities After the Great Recession, to drum-up sales,…

When Germany recently announced some underachieving economic numbers, it was a red flag for the eurozone and Europe. When the stronger of the two pillars in the eurozone (France being the other pillar) begins to show some fragility, you have to take a step back to evaluate the…

The Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) surprised even the most optimistic of economists when it reported the U.S. economy grew at an annual rate of four percent in the second quarter of 2014. On the surface, the number—four percent growth—sounds great. But how serious should we take that…

A few years ago, investors couldn’t get enough of Chinese stocks. This led to numerous frauds committed by crooks in China that has since tarnished the reputation and reliability of all Chinese companies, whether they’re legitimate or not, despite their operating in one of the top growth areas…

Five years ago, it looked like the world was falling apart. Remember when Lehman Brothers went bankrupt, freezing financing on Wall Street? The government had to bail out General Motors and the Federal Reserve pumped money into too-big-to-fail banks. Investors were running scared of the stock market. Seems…

China is facing some growth issues, but so are the majority of the countries in the Western Hemisphere. The country’s new government leader, President Xi Jinping, came on board in March 2013 and is planning to change the landscape of China vis-a-vis a new focus on domestic consumption…

I keep hearing about the economy improving, but I keep asking, where? I ask because the facts continue to say otherwise. The U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis reports gross domestic product (GDP) came in at just 0.1% in the first quarter of 2014. To remind my readers, in…

Consumer spending in the U.S. economy is highly correlated to consumer confidence. If consumers are worried about the economy, they pull back on their spending. The Conference Board Consumer Confidence Index decreased by 1.63% in February from January. (Source: Conference Board, February 25, 2014.) And we see the…

In 2013, the U.S. economy, as measured by gross domestic product (GDP), rose at an average rate of 1.9% compared to 2.8% in 2012. And as it stands, GDP may slow further in 2014. What makes me think this? In January, U.S. industrial production declined by 0.3% from…

These days, I’m not shopping all that much unless there’s a massive discount at the stores. In fact, I only shop when the deals are significant. In my view, this is the new reality in the retail sector. And it’s not only hurting the retail sector, but it…