U.S. Deficit

The debt crisis has taken the world by storm; but few seem to be sounding the alarm. The U.S dollar, the go-to currency for global economic stability and growth, is imploding at an unprecedented rate.

Profit Confidential editors have been critics of the U.S.’s inability to rein-in government spending. Based on the White House’s own figures, the national debt will reach $20.0 trillion by the end of this decade—about 140% of our current gross domestic product (GDP).

Historically, countries that have incurred considerable debt and consistent national debt-to-GDP multiples of 120% or more have experienced currency devaluation. The U.S. dollar has been in a free-fall against other major world currencies since 2009.

Since November 2008, Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke has initiated three rounds of quantitative easing (QE) in an effort to create more economic activity and increase home prices.

Since 2008, the Federal Reserve has printed roughly $3.0 trillion. And, it’s climbing each month by an additional $85.0 billion.

What have three rounds of QE accomplished? It was supposed to increase lending, create more jobs, and lower the unemployment rate. Instead, banks are sitting on a pile of cash and remain tight-fisted, fewer jobs have been created, and the unemployment rate remains high

What QE has done is flood the global markets with trillions of U.S dollars. It’s not as if this new-found money is backed by gold. It’s simply created out of thin air.

And, things are not going to get any better. The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) expects the U.S. economy to remain moribund in 2013 and for unemployment to remain high. What’s more, the official U6 unemployment rate (which includes people who have given up looking for work and people who have part-time jobs but want full-time jobs) has held steady around 15% for months.

The unofficial shadow statistic unemployment rate (which includes the long-term unemployed) sits at 22%!

Americans are out of work, and their dollar doesn’t go as far as it used to. Consumer spending might have once been the workhorse for economic growth, but not anymore. And, that could spell doom for the U.S. economy.

After phenomenal amounts of bailouts were doled out, followed by non-stop government spending, the U.S. national debt rose 76.2%—from $9.2 trillion in 2008 to $16.3 trillion in 2012. (Source: TreasuryDirect, last accessed November 27, 2012.)

It gets worse. The current administration said it would keep the budget deficit below $1.0 trillion. It hasn’t. For fiscal 2012, the federal budget deficit was $1.1 trillion, slightly below the $1.3 trillion deficit recorded in 2011. (Source: U.S. Department of the Treasury, October 12, 2012.) What’s more, 2012 marked the fourth consecutive year in which the U.S. government experienced an annual deficit above $1.0 trillion. As a percentage of GDP, the U.S. government’s budget deficit for the year 2012 stands at seven percent.

Along with skyrocketing government debt, the Federal Reserve has printed $3.0 trillion. Where did the $3.0 trillion come from? It’s not backed by gold. It was simply created out of thin air. And, the presses continue to print an additional $85.0 billion a month!

At Profit Confidential, we believe a home-grown debt crisis is brewing for America, and we believe other aspects of our financial system will suffer because of it


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